Source: abcnews.go.com

Are you a collector, or have you tried collecting things before? Coins, stamps, mugs, fridge magnets just to name a few. It’s actually a fun and exciting hobby once you have more and rare pieces of items included in your collection. It can also be a source of income as the collectible items have value in the market. The rarer and unique it is, the more expensive its price.

However, there are some people who go overboard in their collecting habits. The massive amount of things being collected and stored in their homes begin to affect their way of living, relationships, and outlook in life. It becomes a mental issue that needs professional intervention from mental health specialists.

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, hoarding is a behavior characterized by compulsive purchasing, acquiring, searching, and storing items that have little or no value. They do collect items but unlike responsible collectors, they gather items that are not considered collectibles, such as newspapers, tools, grocery items like toilet papers, and a smorgasbord of non-essential things.

There are several tests that can help in the assessment of a person who has a hoarding problem. Below is an example adapted from The International OCD Foundation – Hoarding Center. This test is not a final tool to diagnose the mental health problem. Your doctor will still need further tests or sessions with you to identify this.

1. I have difficulty using spaces in my home for their intended purpose (for example, eating with others at my kitchen table, sitting on my sofa to watch TV, or sleeping in my bed).
a. Never
b. Sometimes
c. Often/Always

2. Getting rid of my possessions—whether I’m throwing them out, donating them, or selling them—causes me depression, distress, and anxiety.
a. Never
b. Sometimes
c. Often/Always

3. I never pass up a freebie, even if I don’t need it or have space for it.
a. Never
b. Sometimes
c. Often/Always

4. I have duplicates of many things (for example, Italian cookbooks, scarves of the same color, similar toiletry items).
a. Never
b. Sometimes
c. Often/Always

5. I buy things I want, even if I can’t afford it or don’t have space to put it.
a. Never
b. Sometimes
c. Often/Always

Source: npr.org

6. My possessions are so disorganized that I often have a hard time finding what I am looking for.
a. Never
b. Sometimes
c. Often/Always

7. I avoid inviting people to my home because of the clutter.
a. Never
b. Sometimes
c. Often/Always

8. I feel like I have no control over the clutter in my home. My possessions own me.
a. Never
b. Sometimes
c. Often/Always

9. My possessions are a source of family conflict.
a. Never
b. Sometimes
c. Often/Always

10. I notice that other people in my family (for example, a sister, mother, or uncle) have a lot of clutter as well.
a. Never
b. Sometimes
c. Often/Always

Source: lesfurets.com

Score Your Quiz on Hoarding Behaviors

Give yourself 1 point for every A answer, two points for every B, and three points for every C.

Interpretation of scores:

  • 10 to 15 points means you are at low risk for hoarding. Congratulations – your home is clutter-free. The rest of us envy you.
  • 16 to 21 points puts you at medium risk for compulsive hoarding. Don’t let your possessions get the best of you! Organization may not be your strong suit, so try to acquire less and recycle or donate items that you don’t need or no longer use.
  • 22 points or more means you are at high risk for compulsive hoarding. Your possessions are very important to you, and though at times you feel like the clutter is out of control, it’s very difficult for you to throw things away.

Again, if you feel that you need further assistance, please go see and consult your doctor.

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